Sg 5 Volume 59 Number 2 25 July 2005 ISSN 0024-0966

Journal of the Lepidopterists Society

Published quarterly by The Lepidopterists’ Society

THE LEPIDOPTERISTS’ SOCIETY

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

Susan J. WELLER, President Marrua R. Weiss, Vice President Lawrence F, Gaui, Immediate Past President Ernest H. Wintiams, Secretary RieNK bE Jone, Vice President Ketiy M. Ricuers, Treasurer

ANGEL Vitoria, Vice President

Members at large:

William E. Conner Akito Kawahara Robert M. Pyle Rebecca Simmons Jane M. Ruffin John A. Shuey Charles V. Covell Jr. Erik B. Runquist Andrew D. Warren

EprroriaL Boarp

Joun W. Brown (Chairman) Micuast E.. Touiver (Journal) LawrENcE F. Gaui (Memoirs)

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Honorary Lire MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY

Cuartes L. Remincton (1966), E. G. Munroe (1973), Ian F. B. Common (1987), Lincotn P. Brower (1990), Frepertck H. Rinncr (1997), Ronatp W. Honces (2004)

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Journal of The Lepidopterists’ Society (ISSN 0024-0966) is published quarterly by The Lepidopterists’ Society, “> Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007-4057. Periodicals postage paid at Los Angeles, CA and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Lepidopterists’ Society, % Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007-4057.

Cover illustration: Plutella vanella, 8 km NW of Winfield, Alberta, CANADA, 17 July 2003, Charles D. Bird. Photo by Charles Bird. See “New records of microlepidoptera in Alberta, Canada”, this issue

JoURNAL OF

Tue LepriporrerRistTs’ SOCIETY

Volume 59 2005 Number 2

Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 59(2), 2005, 61-82

NEW RECORDS OF MICROLEPIDOPTERA IN ALBERTA, CANADA

GREGORY R. POHL

Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, 5320 - 122 St., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6H 385 email: gpohl@nrcan.ge.ca

CHARLES D. BIRD Box 22, Erskine, Alberta, Canada TOC 1G0 email: cdbird@telus.net

JEAN-FRANCOIS LANDRY Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, 960 Carling Ave, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0C6 email: landryjf@agr.ge.ca

AND

Gary G. ANWEILER E.H. Strickland Entomology Museum, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6G 2H1 email: gganweiler@sprint.ca

ABSTRACT. Fifty-seven species of microlepidoptera are reported as new for the Province of Alberta, based primarily on speci- mens in the Northern Forestry Research Collection of the Canadian Forest Service, the University of Alberta Stricdland Museum, the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes, and the personal collections of the first two authors. These new records are in the families Eriocraniidae, Prodoxidae, Tineidae, Psychidae, Gracillariidae, Ypsolophidae, Plutellidae, Acrolepi- idae, Glyphipterigidae, Elachistidae, Glyphidoceridae, Coleophoridae, Gelechiidae, Xyloryctidae, Sesiidae, Tortricidae, Schrecken- steiniidae, Epermeniidae, Pyralidae, and Crambidae. These records represent the first published report of the families Eriocrani- idae and Glyphidoceridae in Alberta, of Acrolepiidae in western Canada, and of Schreckensteiniidae in Canada. Tetragma gei, Tegeticula corruptrix (Prodoxidae), Scythris mixaula (Xyloryctidae), Nemapogon acapnopennella (Tineidae), Plutella vanella (Plutel- lidae) ), Acrolepiopsis liliitvora (Acrolepiidae), Glyphipterix montisella (Glyphipterigidae), Glyphidocera hurlberti (Glyphidoceridae).

Synanthedon culiciformis (Sesiidae), Epinotia albicapitana (Tortricidae), Schreckensteinia festaliella (Schreckensteiniidae), and Epermenia lomatii (Epermeniidae) are reported for the first time in Canada. As well, further Alberta records of the rarely collected species Blastodacna curvilineella (Elachistidae) and Wockia asperipunctella (Urodidae) are given.

Additional key words: distribution, faunistics.

Alberta is a large province (> 660,000 square km?) in Papilionoidea, Drepanoidea, Geometroidea, and western Canada, comprising primarily boreal forest in Noctuoidea) and the microlepidoptera (primitive the northern half, and aspen parkland and prairie in groups up to and including the Pyraloidea and the southern half, with the Rocky Mountains and Thyridoidea). foothills along the western border. Its lepidopteran The first checklist of Alberta Lepidoptera was fauna contains elements from all of these ecoregions, published by Frederic Hova Wolley-Dod between as well as some exotic introductions. Most of the 1901 and 1906 as a series of articles in The Canadian province was covered by ice in the last glaciation; Entomologist (Wolley-Dod 1901a, b, 1904, 1905a-f, consequently its fauna contains many post-glacial 1906a-c). It listed 613 species of macrolepidoptera, immigrants and few endemic species. Nevertheless, it and a few of the larger microlepidoptera in the has a large and diverse lepidopteran fauna, estimated families Hepialidae, Cossidae, and Sesiidae. In 1951, to contain approximately 3000 species, almost evenly Edmonton Lepidoptera collector Kenneth Bowman divided between the macrolepidoptera (sensu published a comprehensive list of Alberta Kristensen 1999; the superfamilies Mimalonioidea, Lepidoptera, including 657 microlepidoptera and

Lasiocampoidea, Bombycoidea, Hesperioidea, 1168 macrolepidoptera species and varieties. Since

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that time, many taxonomic revisions have been published detailing new records for the province. In recent years, the authors have collected microlepidoptera extensively in Alberta and have examined specimens in local public collections. The current paper reports 57 new Alberta records resulting from this work, and additional localities for two species

previously reported in single locations in the province.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

This list is based on our examination of material housed in the Northern Forestry Centre Research Collection (NF RC), Edmonton; the Strickland Museum of the University of Alberta (UASM), Edmonton; the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC), Ottawa, Ontario; the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Research Lab collection (AGRL), Lethbridge; the Olds College Insect Collection (OLDS), Olds; and the personal collections of the first two authors (POHL, BIRD) and of Douglas Macaulay (DAM) of Barrhead, Alberta. Identities have been confirmed via comparison with cited publications and reference collections, and consultation with appropriate taxonomic experts, as noted below. For the more difficult species, the genitalia were dissected and examined. When av ailable, published revisions were used to make identifications; for groups which have not been revised in the past 100 years; identifications were made via comparison to authoritativ ely identified specimens at the CNC. Voucher specimens of all species are deposited at NFRC, except as noted. Unless otherwise noted, all BIRD specimens were collected by C.D. Bird, and all POHL specimens were collected by G.R. Pohl.

Abbreviations used are as follows: N, north; S, south; E, east; W, west; FIDS, Canadian Forest Service, Forest Insect and Disease Surv ey; FW, forewi ing; HW, hindwing; LT, light trap; MV, mercury vapour; UV, ultraviolet: WS, wingspan.

Species are presented in taxonomic order based on the higher phylogeny presented in Kristensen (1999), and species-level arrangements in the taxonomic revisions cited below.

For each species treated we provide a brief synopsis of information under the following headings: ID: diagnostic characters allowing identification of the species in the context of other species known from western Canada; AB REC: Alberta specimens examined by the authors; DIST: general distribution of the species, as represented in the literature; BIO: a summary of known biological information including host records: COM: any other comments.

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SPECIES ACCOUNTS ERIOCRANIIDAE

Eriocrania semipurpurella (Stephens, 1834)

ID: A small (12 to 14 mm WS) moth with dark brown FW. The FW has a purplish metallic lustre, and a small triangular white mark on the caudal margin, immediately basad of the tornus. Davis (1978) provides a full description and illustrations. Although it is very similar to other species in the family, it is the only species known to occur in western North America.

AB REC: Edmonton, 20 May 1948, K. Bowman [UASM]. Edmonton, CFS Northern Forestry Centre compound, 53.49138°N 113.54390°W, 28 April 1998, G.R. Pohl [NFRC]. 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 21 April 2000, diurnal [POHL]; 11 April 2001, diurnal [POHL]; 19 April 2001, diurnal [POHL]; 16 May 2002, at dusk, A.J.P. Deneka [POHL]. 8 km NW of Winfield, 53.01°N 114.50°W, 900 m, 5 May 2001, UV LT [BIRD]; 12 May 2001, MV light [BIRD]: 12 May 2003, UV LT [BIRD].

DIST: Previously known to occur in eastern North America as far W as Black Sturgeon Lake, Ontario (subspecies semipurpurella (Stephens)), and in western North America (subspecies pacifica Davis) in Alaska, British Columbia (Vancouver Island), and Washington (Davis 1978). It is widely distributed in southern and central Alberta in boreal and mixedwood areas.

BIO: This species is an inhabitant of moist aspen forests. Adults can be quite numerous on warm sunny days in early spring. Larvae are leaf blotch miners. Subspecies semipurpurella feeds on Betula (Betulaceae); in British Columbia, pacifica may feed on Holodiscus discolor (Pursh) Maxim. (Betulaceae) (Davis 1978).

COM: All Alberta specimens examined by the authors conform to the pacifica subspecies. This is the first report of the family Eriocraniidae in Alberta.

PRODOXIDAE

Lampronia russatella (Clemens, 1860)

ID: A small (13 to 15 mm WS) moth with a distinctive pattern of white or pale yellow marks on the FW (Fig. 1), comprising a complete basal band, median costal and dorsal patches, and a distal patch on the costal margin which may be absent in some specimens. The background color of the FW is bronzy brown with a metallic lustre. Dietz (1905) provides a brief treatment of the species, in the genus Incurvaria in the family Tineidae.

AB REC: 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 20 June 2000, at dusk [POHL]; 13 July 2000 [POHL]. 3 km W of Touchwood

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8

Fics. 1-8. Microlepidoptera new to Alberta. 1, Lampronia russatella, 13.5 mm WS, 3 km W of Touchwood Lake, 22 June 1994 J.-F. Landry; 2, Plutella vanella, 17.0 mm WS, 8 km NW of Winfield, 17 July 2003 C.D. Bird; 3, Acrolepiopsis lilitvora, 14.5 mm WS, 8 kn SE of Sherwood Park, 21 April 2001 G.R. Pohl; 4, Blastodacna curvilineella, 16.3 mm WS, Rochon Sands Provincial Park, 1 May 2004 C.D. Bird; 5, Xenolechia velatella, 14.1 mm WS, Rochon Sands Provincial Park, 3 May 2001 C.D. Bird; 6, Acleris paracinderella, 16.8 mm WS, Kananaskis, Elbow Ranger Station, reared, emerged 29 August 1951; 7, Lozotaenia hesperia, 23.2 mm WS, 20 km NE of Zama City, 7 July 1997 G.R. Pohl: 8, Gretchena semialba, 12.6 mm WS, Wandering River.

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Lake, E of Lac La Biche, 22 June 1994, daytime sweeping mosses and sphagnum in boggy swamp, J.-F. Landry [CNC].

DIST: Previously known only from eastern North America, from Montreal, Quebec, and Ithaca, New York (Dietz 1905).

BIO: Unknown.

COM: The genus Lampronia is in need of revision. The status of this and other species may need to be revised in light of a full examination of genitalic structures.

Lampronia capitella (Clerck, 1759)

ID: A small (13 to 15 mm WS) moth with a distinctive pattern of white marks on the FW, comprising an incomplete basal band, median costal and dorsal patches, and a distal patch on the wingtip. The background color of the FW is bronzy brown with a metallic lustre. This species has not been treated in the North American literature. Medvedev (1978) provides genitalia illustrations, and Parenti (2000: Plate 33) provides an excellent color BPECIeEE PL:

AB REC: Barrhead, 2 June 1997, D. Macaulay [DAM]. Long Lake, eee forest at lakeshore, 17 June 1999, UV light [POHL].

DIST: A Holarctic species, reported in North America only from Quebec (Handfield 2002). There are specimens in the CNC from Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia.

BIO: In Europe this species feeds on shoots and buds of Ribes (Grossulariaceae) (Medvedev 1978). Heath & Pelham-Clinton (1976) provide an account of its life history in Great Britain.

COM: Known in Europe as the Currant Shoot Borer. See note on the genus Lampronia under L. russatella above.

Tetragma gei Davis & Pellmyr, 1992

ID: A small to medium-sized (11 to 17 mm WS) light grey moth, with a few scattered darker scales on the FW. Females are larger than the males, and have an extremely long abdomen ending in a sharp ovipositor. Davis et al. (1992) provides a description and illustrations.

AB REC: Porcupine Hills, Skyline Road, 49.93597°N 113.97926°W, montane pine/fir meadow, 3 July 2002, diurnal, D.W. Langor & G.R. Pohl [NFRC] (2 specimens); [CNC] (2 specimens).

DIST: This is the first record of this species in Canada. It was previously known from the northwestern United Sates, in eastern Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, and South Dakota, although it was expected to have a broader distribution (Davis et al. 1992).

BIO: This species occurs in high elevation forb-rich

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meadows, where it can be locally abundant. Larvae are known to feed on Geum triflorum Pursh (Rosaceae) (Davis et al. 1992),

Tegeticula corruptrix Pellmyr, 1999

ID: A relatively large (22 to 35 mm WS), stout- bodied moth with immaculate white FW and brownish grey HW. Pellmyr (1999) provides a description and illustrations, including mouthpart and genital characters for separation from other species of Tegeticula.

AB REC: Lost River Valley, 1 km N of the Montana border, 49.01046°N 110.44424°W, 28 June 2001, shortgrass prairie, hand collected from Yucca glauca one Pohl, Macaulay & Machney [NFRC] (2 specimens). Onefour, 9 July 1950, A. Hewitt [AGRL]. Onefour, 9 July 1950, K. Bowman [UASM].

DIST: Although its occurrence in Alberta in sympatry with T. yuccasella (Riley) has been noted in a unpublished reports (Perry 2001; COSEWIC 2002), this is the first published record of T. corruptrix in Canada. It was previously reported from the western USA, from California to Texas, north to southern Montana. The Onefour area represents the northern limit of Yucca glauca Nutt. (Liliaceae) and of Tegeticula species in Canada.

BIO: The genus Tegeticula has a_ well-known mutualistic relationship with Yucca plants (Pellmyr et al.

1996). Moth larvae are dependent on the plant for food, and the plant is dependent on the moths for pollination. Tegeticula corruptrix is a recently recognized species that 'cheats' by ovipositing in the developing seeds without pollinating the flowers (Pellmyr 1999). Larvae are known to feed on a number of Yucca species (Pellmyr 1999). Yucca glauca is the only Yucca species occurring in Canada; it is restricted to several hundred plants at two sites near Onefour.

TINEIDAE

Nemapogon acapnopennella (Clemens, 1863)

ID: A small (14 mm WS) dark brown and pearly white mottled moth (Fig. 17). The wing pattern is rather nondescript, but is subtly different from other species of the genus known to occur in northwestern North America. Dietz (1905) provides a_re-description. Genitalia illustrations of this species have not been published.

AB REC: Edmonton (edge of Fulton Ravine), 53.545°N 113.439°W, 21 July 2001, sesiid pheromone trap, G.G. Anweiler [NFRC] (5 specimens). Touchwood Lake, 30 km E of Lac La Biche, Rge. 10 Twp. 67 Sec. 32 W 4th Mer., 29 June 1994, UV trap M2-2, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC]; Rge. 10 Twp. 68 Sec. 3 W 4th Mer., 14 July 1995, UV trap 04-5/6, D.W. Langor et al. [NFRC] (2

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specimens).

DIST: This is the first record of this species in Canada. It was previously known only in eastern USA, in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington DC, and Louisiana (Dietz 1905). Specimens in the NFRC from Saskatchewan have recently been identified as this species.

BIO: Unknown. Larvae of other members of the genus feed on bracket fungi (Lawrence & Powell 1969). Adults are rarely collected at lights.

COM: It is interesting that several adults were collected in a sesiid trap; they were males, and were observed in the trap performing complex behavior consistent with courtship. The pheromones of this species are not known, but may contain components chemically similar to those in the sesiid bait. The identity of the specimens listed above was confirmed by D. R. Davis (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, USA). Another, possibly undescribed species of Nemapogon, externally similar to N. acapnopennella but with different genitalia, has been collected in sympatry with N. acapnopennella at the Touchwood Lake site reported above (Pohl et al. 2004). It may prove to be conspecific with an undescribed species similar to N. acapnopennella reported from Quebec (Handfield 1997).

PSYCHIDAE

Taleporia walshella (Clemens, 1862)

ID: A small (12 to 15 mm WS) nondescript moth. Males have an indistinct FW pattern of chestnut brown marks over a light brown background; females are wingless and rarely collected. Davis (1964) provides a detailed description and illustrations. The larvae and females look very similar to those of Dahlica triquetrella (see below); the larvae of these species are indistinguishable, and the females are separable only via microscopical examination of abdominal spines, as described by Sauter (1956).

AB REC: Cypress Hills, Elkwater Lake, 17 June 1996, at light [POHL]. 29 km NE of Zama City, 59.33°N 118.43°W, boreal forest, 17 June 1997, UV trap, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC] (5 specimens); 27 May 1998, UV trap, H.E.J. Hammond et al. [NFRC] (4 specimens).

DIST: This is the first record of the species in northwestern North America. It was previously reported from eastern North America as far N as Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario (Prentice 1965), and as far W as Illinois (Davis 1964).

BIO: Larvae construct and live in elongate triangular cases made of sand grains and debris, from which they feed on lichens (Davis 1964). They have been reared

from several tree species in eastern Canada (Prentice 1965); presumably feeding on lichens on the boles.

COM: This species was originally placed in the genus Solenobia, which is now considered a junior synonym of Taleoporia (Karsholt & Razowski 1996).

Dahlica triquetrella (Hiibner, [1813])

ID: The adult female is a minute (3 to 5 mm length) wingless moth which remains associated with the larval case. Males have not been found in North America. Larvae are the most often encountered life stage; they can be found in distinctive three-sided cases approximately 8 mm long, moving about on house walls. Leech & Sugden (1967) provide a description and illustrations of the larva, larval case, and adult female: Medvedev (1978: Fig. 105) provides male illustrations. The larvae and females look very similar to those of Talporia walshella (see above); the larvae of these species are indistinguishable, and the females are separable only via microscopical examination of abdominal spines, as described by Sauter (1956).

AB REC: vicinity of Blackfalds, June 2000, J. Broatch [NFRC] (6 specimens). 8 km E-SE of Sherwood Park, October 1998, exterior house walls [POHL] (3 specimens); May 1999, reared [POHL] (2 specimens). § km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, May 2000, exterior house walls [POHL].

DIST: This species has been introduced to North America from Europe. It was established in Vernon, British Columbia and Montreal, Quebec by 1927 (Leech & Sugden 1967). It was unknown in the Edmonton area as recently as the 1980s, but has become quite common since then.

BIO: Larvae feed on lichens, and can be found actively moving about throughout the summer and on warm winter days. They are abundant in the Edmonton area, on the walls of buildings. Females are short-lived, and lay eggs on their larval case.

COM: The North American population of this

Palaearctic species appears to be entirely composed of parthenogenetic, wingless females. W ‘inged males are known from Europe (Sauter 1956). Listed) under Solenobia in Hodges et al. (1983), the species is now placed in Dahlica (Karsholt & Razowski 1996).

GRACILLARIIDAE

Micrurapteryx salicifoliella (Chambers, 1872)

ID: A minute (9 to 12 mm WS) moth with very narrow wings and a distinctive FW pattern of diagonal white marks on a dark brown background (Fig. 18). Ives & Wong (1988) provide a brief description and illustrations of the adult, larva, and blotch mine.

AB REC: Junction of Ft. Chipewyan winter road and

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Richardson River, 58.0079°N 111.0271°W, river margin, 12 June 2000, diurnal, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC] (2 specimens); 13 June 2000, UV trap, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC] (2 specimens). Edmonton, Winterburn Road, 20 April 1983, G.D. Braybrook [CNC]. High Level, ex. Salix sp., reared, emerged 2-7 August 1963 [NFRC] (7 specimens); [CNC] (2 specimens). High Level, ex. Salix sp.. reared, emerged 27-29 July 1964 [NFRC] (3 specimens). 30 km S of High Level, ex. Salix leaf mines, reared, 8 July 1993, D.W. Langor [NFRC] (7 specimens); [CNC] (4 specimens). Highway 35, 20 km S of Indian Cabins, ex. Salix sp., reared, 15 July 1990 [NFRC]. Keg River, ex. Salix sp., reared, 27 July 1965 [NFRC] (3 specimens). Marguerite Crag & Tail Provincial Wildland Park, 57, T1O7°N 110.3337°W, stream margin, 15 June 2000, adults on Salix, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC] (7 specimens). Maybelle River Provincial Wildland Park, 58.2092°N 110.9234°W, sand dunes, 12 June 2000, at dusk, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC]. Paddle Prairie, ex. Salix sp., reared, emerged 22-28 July 1964 [NFRC] (6 specimens). 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, 28 October 2001, diurnal [POHL]. Steen River, ex. Salix sp., reared, emerged 5- 13 August 1963 [NFRC] (6 specimens); [CNC] (3 specimens). 29 km NE of Zama City, 59.33°N 118.43°W, boreal forest, 25 May 1997, 4 June 1997, 6 August 1997, UV trap, G.R. Pohl et al. [NFRC] (8 specimens).

DIST: Ives & Wong (1988) report this species from the Prairie Provinces, but give no specific provincial or locality records other than the fact that it has been abundant in north-central Saskatchewan. The NFRC contains specimens from Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwest Territories.

BIO: Larvae are blotch miners on Salix (Salicaceae) species. Adults emerge in August and remain active into October. They overwinter as adults, and reappear on warm days from March to May the following spring. They tend to fly at dusk, but are sometimes collected at lights.

YPSOLOPHIDAE

Ypsolopha dentella (Fabricius, 1775)

ID: A medium-sized (18 to 20 mm WS) moth with falcate FW with a distinctive pattern; the costal three fourths of the wing is chocolate brown, separated from the yellow caudal area by a thin white line that extends into the brown area at about two-thirds the distance from the wing base. Parenti (2000: Plate 52) provides an excellent color photograph.

AB REC: Mountainview County, Olds, 4 September 1995, 14 September 1995, 27 July - 4 August 1997, 25

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July 1998, 14 August 1998, 18-25 August 2000, 14 Se Eee 2000, LT, E. Mengersen [BIRD] (2 specimens); [NFRC]; [OLDS] (12 specimens). Stettler County, McKenzie Crossing, 13 km W of Big Valley, 15 September 2000, E. Mengersen [OLDS].

DIST: This introduced European species has not been previously reported in western North America. It is listed by Handfield (1997) as occurring in Quebec/Labrador, and by Forbes (1923) as occurring in northeastern USA (treated by the latter as "Cerostoma [=Plutella] xylostella Linnaeus", a name that now refers to the diamondback moth; however the description by Forbes unmistakably refers to Y. dentella).

BIO: Larvae feed on Lonicera (Caprifoliaceae). Agassiz (1996) provides a short account of the life history.

COM: This species is known as the European Honeysuckle Leafroller. It has probably been introduced to our area within the last four decades.

PLUTELLIDAE

Plutella vanella Walsingham, 1881

ID: A medium sized (15 to 17 mm WS) moth with a distinctive FW pattern, consisting of a chocolate-brown background, two diagonal white bands which converge on the caudal margin, and a white mark on the costal margin between the diagonal bands (Fig. 2). This species has not been treated in the Nearctic literature since its original description.

AB REC: Banff, ex. white spruce, reared, 26 July 1952 [CNC]. 23 [miles?] W [of] Banff, ex. white spruce, reared, 21 August 1953 [CNC]. Bearberry Creek near Sundre, 23 July 1926, C.H. Young [C NC]. Belly River, ex. white spruce, reared, 26 July 1954 [CNC]. Big Horn River, ex. white spruce, reared, 18 July 1952 [CNC]. 20 miles W-SW Claresholm, ex. willow, reared, emerged 22 July 1956 [NFRC]. Clearwater County, 30 km W of Sundre, NE 12 Twp. 34 Rge. 7 W 5th Mer., 1-14 August

1999, E. Mengersen [OLDS] (6 specimens). Clearwater County, 10 km NW of Bearberry, 24 July 2001, 4 August 2001, 15 July 2002, 19 July 2002, E. Mengersen [OLDS] (11 specimens). Entrance, 7 August 1963. LT [NFRC]. Erskine, 52.32°N 112.88°W, 800 m, aspen parkland, 20 July 2002, UV LT [BIRD]. Ft. McMurray, Hangingstone River Valley off Highway 63, 56.68490°N 111. 35508°W, Populus, Picea, Abies & Alnus forest, 12 July 2001, MV light, A.D. Macaulay et al. [NFRC] (3 specimens). enmde Cache, 3 km N of South Smoky River Campground, at river, 53.89029°N 119.15671°W, 953 m, aspen/spruce forest, 8 August 2003, UV trap, D. Macaulay [DAM]. Grande Prairie, 16 July 1963, LT [NFRC]. Holmes Crossing Staging Area, 7.3 km SE of Fort Assiniboine, 54.29403°N 114.86665°W, pine forest,

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18 July 2003, UV trap, D. Macaulay [DAM]. Jasper, 26 July 1926, J.-H. McDunnough [CNC]. La Butte Creek Wildland Provincial Park, rock outcrop 13 km E of junction of La Butte Creek and Slave River, 59.36549°N 111.12988°W, open Pinus banksiana/Picea, 9 July 2001, UV trap, A.D. Macaulay et al. [NFRC]. La Butte Creek Wildland Provincial Park, 3 km S of junction of La Butte Creek and Slave River, La Butte Point, 59.40578°N 111.45251°W, Picea glauca forest, § July 2001, MV light, A.D. Macaulay et al. [NFRC]. Medicine Lake Recreational Area, 52.749°N 114.744°W, 950 m, aspen/alder woods beside lake, 5 August 2003, UV LT [BIRD]. 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 28 July 2003, MV light [POHL]. Mountainview County, 3 km NE of Bergen, 17 July 1989, E. Mengersen [OLDS]; Camp Harmattan, 26 July 1997, E. Mengersen [OLDS]; SW 13 Twp. 33 Rge. 4 W 5th Mer., 26 June 1988, E. Mengersen [OLDS]. 38 km NW of Sundre, bench above James River, 51.80°N 115.21°W, 1360 m, lodgepole pine, 28 July 2002, UV LT [BIRD] (3 specimens). 8 km NW of Winfield, 53.01°N, 114.50°W, mixed woods, 15 July 2000, 28 July 2000, 11 July 2001, 18 July 2001, 17 July 2003, UV LT [BIRD] (16 specimens); 17 July 2003, MV light [BIRD] (2 specimens). 29 km NE of Zama City, 59.33°N 118.43°W, boreal forest, 28 July 1997, 6 August 1997, UV trap, G.R. Pohl et al. [NF RC] (3 specimens).

DIST: This species is reported for the first time in Canada. It has been treated in the North American literature only in California (Powell & Hsu 1998; Powell 1999).

BIO: Unknown, other than the rearing note on one of the specimens listed above.

COM: It is odd that this common and distinctive species was missed by Bowman (1951). It appears to be generally distributed in the northern half of the province and in the parkland and foothills.

ACROLEPIIDAE

Acrolepiopsis liliivora Gaedike, 1994

ID: A small (12 to 15 mm WS) moth with brown FW with diffuse blackish irrorations and a small white triangular oblique mark in the middle of the caudal edge (Fig. 3). Gaedike (1994) provides a description and genitalia illustrations, including characters for distinguishing it from similar species of Acrolepiopsis.

AB REC: 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 2] April 2001 [POHL]; 20 June 2001, house light, G.R. Pohl [CNC]; 22 June 2002, MV light, G.R. Pohl [CNC], 14 April 2003, at dusk [POHL].

DIST: This is the first record of the species in Canada. It was previously known from California and

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Oregon (Gaedike 1994).

BIO: Some of the type material of this species was reared from the bulbs of Lilium washingtonianum Kell. (Liliaceae), which does not occur in Alberta. Several other Liliaceae species occur in Alberta (Moss 1983). In 2003 the authors collected a larva of an Acrolepiidae species which had been mining an unripened fruit of fairy bells (Disporum trachycarpum (S. Wats.) B. & H. (Liliaceae)), from the site where the above specimens were collected.

COM: The type material of this species included only six specimens and we are unaware of other published records besides the original series and the specimens reported here. This species was considered distinct from A. californica Gaedike by Gaedike (1994) on the basis of slight genitalic differences, and a different host plant (A. californica was reared from Disporum hookeri). Dr. J.A. Powell (pers. comm.) has reared A. californica from both Lilium and Disporum in California, and considers A. liliivora to be conspecific with A. californica. This is the first report of the family Acrolepiidae from western Canada.

GLYPHIPTERIGIDAE

Glyphipterix montisella Chambers, 1875

ID: A small (12 mm WS) moth with greenish brown FW, with a series of white marks along the costal and caudal wing margins. Heppner (1985) provides a description and _ illustrations, including genitalic characters for separation from similar species of glyphipterigids.

AB REC: Calgary, 17 August 1984, D. Lawrie [NFRC].

DIST: This is the first report of this species in Canada. It was previously known from western USA, as far north as Glacier National Park, Montana (Heppner 1985). G.R. Pohl has seen a specimen from the vicinity of Weyburn in SE Saskatchewan.

BIO: Larvae may feed on one or more species of Juncus (Juncaceae) (Heppner 1985).

ELACHISTIDAE Depressariinae

Semioscopis merriccella Dyar, 1902

ID: A relatively large (22 to 30 mm WS) grey moth with grey FW extended into a blunt tip, and with an interrupted, wavy black line through the center. It can be separated from S. packardella (Clem.) by the wavy black line through the FW, which is uninterrupted in the latter species. Hodges (1974) provides a description and photograph; Clarke (1941) provides genitalia illustrations.

AB REC: Big Knife Provincial Park, 52.49°N

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112.22°W, chokecherry/saskatoon, 1 May 2002, UV LT [BIRD]; 14 May 2003, UV LT [BIRD] (2 specimens). Holmes Crossing, 7 km SE of Fort Assiniboine, 12 May 2001, mixedwood forest, D. Macaulay [NFRC]. Red Deer, 3 May 1923, K. Bowman [UASM].

DIST: Hodges (1974) reports this species “from Maine west through the northern tier of States and southern Canada to British Columbia” but does not specifically mention Alberta. Though expected, these are the first records known from Alberta.

BIO: Unknown.

Depressaria atrostrigella Clarke, 1941

ID: A relatively large (22 to 25 mm WS) grey moth with a series of straight black dashes along the veins of the FW. It is similar in overall habitus to several other species of Depressariinae, but no other North American species has this FW pattern. Hodges (1974) provides a description and photograph; Clarke (1941: Fig. 194) provides male genitalia figures.

AB REC: Buffalo Lake Conservation Area, 52.53°N 112.70°W, aspen parkland, 17 September 2001, 24 September 2001, UV LT [BIRD] (2 specimens). Edmonton, 5 September 1950, K. Bowman [UASM]. Tolman Bridge, 51.33504°N 113.01042°W, 707 m, Stipa/Artemisia grassland, 24 August 2003, UV LT [BIRD] (2 specimens). Tolman Bridge, 51.83461°N 113.01139°W, 706 m, chokecherry/aspen, 24 Aug 2003, UV LT [BIRD].

DIST: Previously reported from Manitoba and Colorado (Hodges 1974).

BIO: Unknown.

Elachistinae

Elachista maritimella McDunnough, 1942

ID: A small (10 mm WS) variably colored moth with narrow wings. The FW is usually grey with two pairs of white transverse patches on the leading and caudal margins at one-third and two-thirds from the base. Individual specimens may vary from very dark to completely white. Kaila (1999) provides a description and illustrations, including genitalic characters for separation from many similar Elachista species.

AB REC: 8 km NW of Winfield, 53.01°N, 114.50°W, mixed woods, 24 June 2000, UV LT [BIRD].

DIST: Previously known from eastern Canada and from Saskatchewan (Kaila 1999).

BIO: Unknown.

Agonoxeninae

Blastodacna curvilineella (Chambers, 1872) ID: A small (11 to 17 mm WS) moth with lanceolate wings. The FW is cream colored with a dusting of

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brown scales and two patches of black tufted scales (Fig. 4). A black dash is present on some specimens in the center of the FW. Forbes (1923) provides a brief description; we know of no published illustration of it. AB REC: Cypress Hills, 49.57°N 110.35°W, mixedwood hillside, 15 June 1996, UV trap [POHL]. Cypress Hills, 49.63°N 110.40°W, aspen hillside, 15 June 1996, UV trap [POHL] (2 specimens). Cypress Hills, Elkwater Lake, 17 June 1996, at light, G.R. Pohl

[NFRC]; [POHL] (2 specimens). Rochon Sands Provincial Park, 52.46°N 112.88°W, 720. m,

chokecherry/saskatoon, 1 May 2004, UV LT [BIRD]. § km E-SE of Sherwood Park, wet meadow, 7 June 1996 [POHL]. 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 20 June 2000, MV light [POHL].

DIST: This species was previously known from eastern United States (Forbes 1923) and Quebec/Labrador (Handfield 1997), and has recently been reported from Touchwood Lake in east-central Alberta (Pohl et al. 2005). The current records indicate a broader distribution in Alberta.

BIO: Larvae are borers in the fruit of Crateagus and related species of Rosaceae (Forbes 1923).

COM: This species is extremely similar to Blastodacna bicristatella (Chambers) (not known from northwestern North America), and may be conspecific with it.

XYLORYCTIDAE Scythridinae

Scythris mixaula Meyrick, 1916

ID: A medium-sized (18 mm WS), grey to dirty white slender moth, in some specimens with paler streaks highlighting the FW veins. Landry (1991) provides a description and _ illustrations, including genitalic characters for separation from similar species. The coloration of $. mixaula varies across its range from nearly immaculate ivory white in the South to darker grey in the North. The Tolman Bridge specimen is rather dark grey (though discolored by greasiness) whereas the Buffalo Lake specimen is pale dirty white with some pale brown dusting in the middle of the FW.

AB REC: Buffalo Lake Conservation Area, 52.4985°N 112.702°W, Artemisia grassland, 30 August 2003, UV LT [BIRD]. Tolman Bridge Recreation Area, 16 September 2000, LT, E. Mengersen [CNC].

DIST: This is the first record of the species in Canada. It was previously known from southern California to southwestern Texas and the western parts of the Great Plains, N to Montana (Landry (1991).

BIO: Larvae have been reared from cactus, including prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp.) although details of

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their life history are unknown (Landry 1991).

GLYPHIDOCERIDAE

Glyphidocera hurlberti Adamski, 2000

ID: A medium-sized (17 to 19 mm WS) moth with greyish brown FW and pale brown HW. Adamski (2000) provides a description and illustrations. It can be separated from all known Lepidoptera in western Canada by the combination of the evenly arcuate HW terminal margin (separating it from all gelechiids except Anacampsis spp.) and the unique pattern of four indistinct dark brown spots on the FW. It can be separated from other Glyphidocera species by the unique shape of the genitalic structures, as described by Adamski (2000).

AB REC: Big Knife Provincial Park, 52.486°N 112.206°W, 692 m, meadow with aspen/buckbrush, 8 July 2003, UV LT [BIRD]. Edmonton, 24 July 1939, 4 July 1940, 20 June 1941, 2 July 1943, 11-27 July 1945, 24 June to 13 July 1950, K. Bowman [UASM] (15 specimens). Edmonton, Windsor Park area, 8 July 1998, UV LT, F.A.H. Sperling [UASM]. Erskine, 52.32°N 112.88°W, 800 m, aspen parkland, § July 2000, 1 August 2000, 12 July 2001, 5 August 2002, UV LT [BIRD]. 12 km S-SE of Erskine, 52.20°N 112.83°W, 800 m, 24 July 2000, UV LT [BIRD]. Lowden Springs Conservation Area, 17 km S of Stettler, 52.09°N 112.425°W, 830 m, 23 July 2002, UV LT [BIRD] (3 specimens). 3 km S of Nevis, Allen Hall acreage, 52.31°N 113.05°W, 815 m, aspen parkland, 15 September 2002, 16 July 2003, UV LT [BIRD]. 8 km E-SE of Sherwood Park, wet meadow, 6 July 1999, at dusk [POHL]. 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 19 July 2000, houselight [POHL]; 11 July 2002, MV light [POHL] (2 specimens); 25 June 2003, houselight [POHL]. Strathcona County, Strathcona Wilderness Centre, aspen forest, 20 July 2001, MV light [POHL].

DIST: Previously known only from Colorado (Adamski 2000).

BIO: Unknown. Adults are active at dusk and at night, flying and running with rapid jerky movements.

COM: Prior to it being recognized as a distinct species in 2000, G. hurlberti specimens were often identified as G. septentrionella Busck. Specimens in the Bowman collection were found scattered in undetermined lots under several families. This is the first published report of the family Glyphidoceridae in Alberta.

COLEOPHORIDAE Coleophorinae

Coleophora rosaefoliella Clemens, 1864 ID: A small (11 to 12 mm WS) cream-colored moth

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with the distal third of the FW light rusty brown and white, and with brown annulations on the antennae. Landry (1998b) provides illustrations of the genitalia and larval case, which allow separation from similar species of Coleophora.

AB REC: Edmonton, 14-19 June 1940, 11-18 June 1946, K. Bowman [UASM] (5 specimens).

DIST: This species was described from Pennsylvania, and has been reported from Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, and British Columbia (McDunnough 1946, Landry 1998b).

BIO: Larvae are case-bearers, and feed attached to the base of leaf buds of Rosa species (Rosaceae) (McDunnough 1946).

GELECHIIDAE

Coleotechnites laricis (Freeman, 1965)

ID: A small (10 to 11 mm WS), narrow-winged black and white moth, very similar to other species of Coleotechnites which feed on conifers. Freeman (1965) provides a description and illustrations. It can be identified most easily by the mining habits of the larva (see below); structural differences separating it from other species are very slight.

AB REC: Edmonton, ex. Larix sp., reared, 3 June 1985 [NFRC].

DIST: Previously known from the type series, collected at various localities in Ontario (Freeman 1965), and more recently from Quebec/Labrador (Handfield 1997).

BIO: This species is known as the Orange Larch Tubemaker. Larvae are needle miners in larch (Larix spp. (Pinaceae)) (Freeman 1965).

COM: The specimen listed above was identified in 1985 by A. Mutuura.

Xenolechia velatella (Busck, 1907)

ID: A medium-sized (14 to 16 mm WS) dark grey moth with a unique pattern on the FW; a pale tan costal margin proximally, and a distinct pattern of raised patches of black scales (Fig. 5).

AB REC: Big Knife Povincial Park, 52.494°N 112.222°W, 675 m, chokecherry/saskatoon, 14 May 2003, UV LT [BIRD] (3 specimens); MV light [BIRD] (3 specimens). Buffalo Lake Conservation Area, 52.53°N 112.70°W, aspen parkland, 7 May 2001, UV LT [BIRD]. Edmonton, 30 May 1946, 26 April 1949, 22 May 1951, K. Bowman [UASM] (3 specimens). Erskine, 52.322°N 112.883°W, 830 m, aspen woods, 20 May 2003, UV trap [BIRD]. Rochon Sands Provincial Park, 52.463°N 112.895°W, 830 m, chokecherry/saskatoon, 13 May 2003, UV LT [BIRD] (8 specimens). 8 km SE of Sherwood Park, 53.47792°N 113.22912°W, aspen forest, 4 June 2000, houselight [POHL]; 2 June 2001, at dusk.

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G.R. Pohl [NFRC]; 25 May 2003, houselight [POHL]; 26 May 2003, MV light [POHL].

DIST: This species was described from Arizona (Busck 1907). The only published record of it in northwestern North America is its inclusion in a list of Lepidoptera specimens collected by FIDS_ in

Saskatchewan and Manitoba, by Wong & Melvin (1969).

BIO: The specimens on which the Wong & Melvin (1969) report is based are housed in the NFRC; they were reared from Black Knot Fungus (Apiosporina morbosa (Schw.) Arx on Prunus species (Rosaceae) tree branches.

Caryocolum pullatella (Tengstrém, 1848)

ID: A small (11 mm WS) black moth, with two median grey patches on the caudal margin of the FW, and a white postmedial line. Huemer (1988) provides a description and genital characters for species of Caryocolum.

AB REC: J. J. Collett Natural Area, 11 km NE of Lacombe, 52. 33°N 113.28°W, 850 m, 27 August 2002, UV LT [BIRD].

DIST: This holarctic species is known from Europe, northern Asia, and Japan. In North America it has been reported in the United States from New York to Oregon, and from Canada in Nova Scotia (Huemer 1988).

BIO: Unknown. All hosts of other Caryocolum species are in the family Caryophyllaceae (Huemer 1988); the host plant of C. pullatella i is likely a Caryophyllaceae species as well.

Caryocolum cassella (Walker, 1864) ID: A small (12 to 13 mm WS) black moth, with two median grey patches on the caudal margin of the FW,

illustrations, including

separation from other

known

and an interrupted white postmedial line. Huemer (1988) provides a description and illustrations, including genital characters for separation from other species of Caryocolum.

AB REC: Big Knife Provincial Park, 52.49°N 112.22°W, 8 August 2002, UV LT [BIRD]. 13 km W of Big Valley, McKenzie Crossing, 52.375°N 112.96°W, 16 July 2000, UV LT [BIRD].

DIST: This Holarctic species has been reported from British Columbia (Vancouver Island), and from Utah, Oregon, Michigan, and Kentucky (Huemer 1988).

BIO: In Europe, this species feeds on Stellaria nemorum L. (Caryophyllaceae) (Huemer 1988). The larvae feed in webbed-together shoots, "particularly in shadowy woodland" (Huemer 1988).

Dichomeris bilobella (Zeller, 1873)

ID: A medium sized (16 to 17 mm WS) blue-grey and black moth with a triangular FW, featuring a distinctive

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